When God Brings Your Troubled Child Home, but Not the Way you Expected

“God has answered prayers and brought our daughter home to us – but she has AIDS!”broken2

“My son is back, but he’s seriously ill with cirrhosis of the liver. He might need a transplant.”

Hopes were shattered. You prayed and prayed and waited and waited for your child’s return from “out there”. They indulged in wild living, stubbornness, and pride. You’ve held on for a good outcome. For a long time.

You begged God for their protection.

For light consequences.

For as little pain as possible.

To be spared from bad things.

You did your best to trust Him. To let go. To detach in love. To stop enabling, over-helping and rescuing. Sometimes you succeeded. Other times you didn’t. It’s been rough.

Then it happened – they finally returned – but, you never expected them to come home like they did. Sometimes we don’t get a happy ending.

Floods in Parenting

 

In this aerial photo, people use a canoe to navigate a flooded street, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2015, in Arnold, Mo. Surging Midwestern rivers forced hundreds of evacuations, threatened dozens of levees and brought transportation by car, boat or train to a virtual standstill Thursday in the St. Louis area. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

In this aerial photo, people use a canoe to navigate a flooded street, Thursday, Dec. 31, 2015, in Arnold, Mo. Surging Midwestern rivers forced hundreds of evacuations, threatened dozens of levees and brought transportation by car, boat or train to a virtual standstill Thursday in the St. Louis area. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Recently there’s been flooding in several states across the country. You may know someone who’s been affected. It might even be you. Over the holidays I received a text from a friend asking for prayer. Their get-away home in North Carolina was involved in a flood.  They plan to retire there. So many unknowns. How frightening and what a mess.

It occurred to me that what many of us go through as hurting parents of children who struggle with addictions, mental illness, sexual identity issues, incarceration, suicidal tendencies, self-injury (and more) is much like what people experience in a flood.

Here’s why:

Where Can Hurting Parents Find Help?

*This is a re-post of a blog I wrote a year ago.

If you’re a hurting parent who’s been deeply wounded by your son or daughter’s choices, behaviors and troubles you know how lonely this experience can be.

Broken. Crushed. Hopeless. Bitter. Resentful.

Rejected. Grief-stricken. Heart-sick. Anxiety-ridden. majesty3

Do you see yourself here? Do any of these describe where you’ve been or where you are right now? If so, then I have good news for you. Yes. good. And yes, for. You.

I want you to know about an opportunity to receive ongoing support and encouragement from a parent who’s been in your shoes – in each of those descriptions – who really understands.

From who? From me. I’m the mom of a daughter (now 29) who’s struggled for over ten years with addictions, self-injury (cutting), brain disorders (mental illness) and suicidal tendencies. I know how hard it is to walk this path and keep your sanity.